Assignment Korea 1960 Troop Ship

In 1968, North Korea captured a U.S. war ship and tortured the 82 sailors on board

The USS Pueblo is still being held in Pyongyang

By the time White House aides woke President Lyndon B. Johnson in the middle of the night on January 23, 1968, it was already too late — the Navy’s intelligence vessel, the USS Pueblo, sent to spy on North Korea, had been seized by the Communist country.

For weeks, the Pueblo coasted, intercepting communication without incident. As part of Cold War reconnaissance, the Navy and the National Security Agency wanted updates on the status of North Korea’s growing military and the Pueblo — a specialized spy ship packed with advanced sensors and encryption equipment — was the right fit for the mission.

But soon, the warnings came. On January 20, a North Korean modified Soviet-style submarine chaser passed within 4,000 yards of the Pueblo, which was about 15 miles southeast of Mayang-Do — North Korea’s most important submarine base. The next day, a pair of fishing trawlers made an aggressive approach within 30 yards of the Pueblo, but they also veered away.

On January 23, however, the USS Pueblo was approached by a North Korean submarine chaser — a small, fast ship designed to find, track and deter, damage or destroy enemy submarines — and was ordered to stand down or be fired upon. According to U.S. reports, the Pueblo was in international waters 16 miles from shore, but the North Koreans insisted the Americans were in their territory. The Pueblo attempted to maneuver away but, as a slow-moving ship, it had no chance of outrunning the chaser.

Immediately, several warning shots were fired and soon three torpedo boats joined the chaser while two MiG fighter jets provided air cover. A fourth torpedo boat and a second submarine chaser appeared a short time later.

The North Koreans opened fire with cannons and machine guns, wounding the American commander and two others.

The Pueblo was severely outmatched in part because of its intelligence mission, but also because its ammunition was stored belowdecks and its machine guns were wrapped to disguise them — nevermind that no one on the ship had been properly trained to use them.

Faced with an inevitable capture, the Americans stalled for time so they could destroy as much of the classified information on board as possible, but a shredder became jammed with the piles of papers shoved into it, and burning the documents in waste baskets filled the cabins with smoke.

One recent declassified NSA report captures exactly how deeply the debacle ran: “Radio contact between Pueblo and the Naval Security Group in Kamiseya, Japan, had been ongoing during the incident. As a result, Seventh Fleet command was fully aware of Pueblo’s situation. Air cover was promised but never arrived. The Fifth Air Force had no aircraft on strip alert, and estimated a two to three-hour delay in launching aircraft. USS Enterprise was located 510 nautical miles (940 km) south of Pueblo, yet its four F-4B aircraft on alert were not equipped for an air-to-surface engagement. Enterprise’s captain estimated that 1.5 hours (90 minutes) were required to get the converted aircraft into the air. By the time President Lyndon B. Johnson was awakened, Pueblo had been captured and any rescue attempt would have been futile.”

Initially, the Pueblo followed the North Korean vessels to shore, as ordered, but then stopped. The North Korean ships fired upon the Pueblo again, killing one American sailor, and then boarded the ship and sailed the Pueblo — and the remaining 82 sailors — to the port of Wonsan.

And that’s when their true and enduring ordeal began.

The crew members were blindfolded and transported to Pyongyang, where they were charged with spying within North Korea’s 12-mile territorial limit and immediately imprisoned. It was the biggest crisis in two years of increased tension and minor incidents between the U.S. and North Korea.

North Korea kept them alive, but not much more.

“I got shot up in the original capture, so we were taken by bus and then train for an all-night journey to Pyongyang in North Korea, and then they put us in a place we called the barn,” Robert Chicca, a Marine corps sergeant who served as a Korean linguist on the ship, later recalled. “We had fried turnips for breakfast, turnip soup for lunch, and fried turnips for dinner….There was never enough to eat, and personally I lost about 60 pounds over there.”

Back home, there was dissent among government officials over how to handle the crisis. Representative Mendel Rivers of South Carolina became a vocal advocate for the president, issuing an ultimatum that North Korea return the Pueblo and the hostages or prepare for a nuclear attack. For his part, Johnson was deeply worried that even agitating rhetoric would result in the execution of the hostages.

However, within days of their capture, President Johnson’s attention was redirected toward the Vietnam War when the Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese Army launched a surprise attack against the U.S., the South Vietnamese, and their allies in what became known as the Tet Offensive — an event that forced the president to order no direct retaliation against North Korea.

With little attention from the U.S., North Korea moved ahead with torturing the captives in an effort to obtain a confession and an apology. Commander Lloyd M. Bucher was psychologically tortured, including being put through a mock firing squad. Soon, the North Koreans threatened to execute his men in front of him. Eventually, Bucher agreed to “confess to his and the crew’s transgression.” They verified the meaning of what he wrote, but failed to catch his pronunciation when he read “We paean the DPRK [North Korea]. We paean their great leader Kim Il Sung.” (He pronounced “paean” as “pee on.”)

Some prisoners also rebelled in photo shoots by casually sticking out their middle finger, a gesture that their captors didn’t understand. Later, the North Koreans caught on and beat the Americans for a week.

According to recently declassified documents, the Johnson administration considered several high-risk courses of retaliatory action, including a blockade of North Korean ports, air strikes on military targets, and a bogus intelligence leak to the Soviets that the United States planned to attack North Korea.

But one stood out more than all the others.

Pentagon war planners considered using nuclear weapons to stop a possible communist invasion of South Korea, as well as mounting a massive air attack to wipe out North Korea’s air force. The nuclear option, ironically codenamed “Freedom Drop,” envisioned the use of American aircraft and surface-to-air missiles to decimate North Korean troops.

However, President Johnson remained committed to a diplomatic solution to the standoff. That, too, had its challenges.

Richard A. Ericson, a political counselor for the American embassy in Seoul, and George Newman, the Deputy Chief of Mission in Seoul, predicted how the negotiations would play out: “If your sole objective is to get the crew back, you will be playing into North Korea’s hands and the negotiations will follow a clear and inevitable path. You are going to be asked to sign a document that the North Koreans will have drafted. They will brook no changes. It will set forth their point of view and require you to confess to everything they accuse you of.”

They added: “If you allow them to, they will take as much time as they feel they need to squeeze every damn thing they can get out of this situation in terms of their propaganda goals, and they will try to exploit this situation to drive a wedge between the U.S. and the ROK. Then when they feel they have accomplished all they can, and when we have agreed to sign their document of confession and apology, they will return the crew. They will not return the ship. This is the way it is going to be because this is the way it has always been.”

Negotiations for the release of the crew took place at Panmunjom along the border of North and South Korea. And, true to the prediction, in December 1968, Major General Gilbert H. Woodward, the chief U.S. negotiator, signed a statement acknowledging that the Pueblo had “illegally intruded into the territorial waters of North Korea” and apologized for “the grave acts committed by the U.S. ship against” North Korea.

On December 23, 1968, exactly 11 months after the Pueblo’s capture, U.S. and North Korean negotiators reached a settlement to resolve the crisis. That day, the surviving 82 crewmen walked one by one across the “Bridge of No Return” at Panmunjon to freedom in South Korea and returned home to the United States in time for Christmas.

The U.S. then verbally retracted the ransom admission, apology, and assurance. Meanwhile, the North Koreans blacked out the paragraph above the signature, which read: “and this hereby receipts for eighty two crewmen and one corpse.”

The USS Pueblo remains the only U.S. Navy ship held by a foreign government. In 2012, North Korea put on it a fresh coat of paint and added some exhibit labels, making it a tourist destination at the Fatherland War of Liberation Museum along the Pothong river in Pyongyang. It has since been moved to the Victorious War Museum.

Usns Troopships To Korea

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Marine Corps Messages posted to this BBS:
































Entry: 9315USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

ROBERT SMITH wrote on March 14, 2017

Brookfield WI


Comments:

Went on the Meigs in late August 1951. After an overnight
stop in Japan landed in Korea early September as part of
3/5 Ist Marine division Assigned to Item Company of 3/5
until about March of 1952 .........assigned to Easy Med
until November and headed home. Hello anybody





Entry: 9051USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

DELBERT RAY HOULETTE wrote on February 5, 2014

Las Vegas NV


Comments:

I arrived in Pusan, Korea on Aug. 2nd 1950 aboard the USS
Henrico,after a short stop in San Francisco for repairs. I
was assigned to H&S Batt. 1st Bn. 11th Mar. Regt. and
attached to B-1-5 as part of a Forward Observer team. and
remained there untill I returned to the States April 1951. I
was the only original member of the FO team to survive. I
retired from the Corps Jan. 31, 1967 as a GYSGT E-7. I am
100% medically retired due to my service at the Chosin Res.
I am a member of the ChosinFew. If you were there I would
love to here from you. Not many of us left. SF Marines





Entry: 9050USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

GERALD F MERNA wrote on January 29, 2014

Arlington VA


Comments:

As a Staff Sergeant I was a member of L Co., 20th
Replacement Draft, Staging Regiment, Camp Pendleton, CA from
Feb. 13th to April 4th, 1952. We boarded the USNS General
John Pope on April 5th with our draft consisting of 168
Officers and 2,780 Enlisted men. We arrived in Kobe, Japan
on May 1st for a brief liberty before proceeding to the Port
of Inchon, arriving on May 5th when we were shuttled forward
by railroad in serials to the 1st Marine Division rail-head
at Munsan-Ni. There we were received and boarded trucks to
our assigned units. I was assigned to Weapons Company, First
Battalion, Fifth Marines (ATA-1stBn-5thMar-1stMarDiv) where
I was one of the three Anti-Tank Assault Section Leaders--
First Section. The first section was in support of A Co,
1/5; the second section (TSgt Don Lupo) supported B Co, 1/5
and the 3d Section (TSgt Corbett) supported C Co, 1/5. Don
Lupo and I were promoted to Technical Sergeant while serving
in this assignment. Unfortunately Don was killed in action
in January 1953. I would serve with three other units before
I finished my 13-month Korea tour, including Easy Co, 2ndBn,
5thMarines. My Brother Jim, a Sgt., arrived on the 21st
draft in June 52 and initially went to another Unit but very
shortly thereafter we arranged to have him join me in the
1stBn, 5thMar. Years later I would become a Master Gunnery
Sergeant before being appointed a commissioned officer on my
way to Vietnam.
Gerald F. Merna, 1stLt, USMC Ret. (Mustang)
gfmerna-usmc@verizon.net





Entry: 8666USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

TOM HUTCHINSON wrote on April 25, 2010


Comments:

Went over on the 11th draft in 1951,was in South & Centeral conflits. With G-3-11,would like to hear from anyone in the unit.





Entry: 8616USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

ERNIE NEEDHAM..USMC RET. wrote on March 9, 2009


Comments:

21st replacement draft San Diego to Yokohama, aboard the USNS General Miegs. May 1952.





Entry: 8598USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

RICH KUYKENDALL wrote on March 5, 2009


Comments:

To: Leo Arruza: I was aboard the USNS General Walker in Dec1953, landing at Kobe on Christmas Eve night. Justin Bates (I don't recall his rank) was on the same ship. I was the Lieutenant who led the singing of Christmas Carol, and I played the piano. We were in the hold of the ship.

Do I have the right ship? Semper Fi, Rich Kuykendall





Entry: 8553USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

PIERRE PETERSON wrote on January 24, 2009


Comments:

More 22nd Draft on the M.C. Meigs: Anyone remember the storm we hit on
the way over? An email from Ernie Needham, also on the Meigs, about my
earlier response to this thread reminded me of that storm. I was a
commercial fisherman (though not a deep-water one) for many years, but
never saw anything like that. There were waves higher than the ship. Also,
like Sgt Reilly I got SP duty in Yokohama, but I was a flop as a cop and the
night was a bummer. One last memory: As the Meigs pulled away from the
dock at Yokohama, a taxi came screaming around the dock building and two
awol Marines piled out, waving and yelling. The pilot boat brought them to
the Meigs, and I understand they spent the rest of the trip to Inchon in the
brig. I later saw that exact scene in the movie "Bridges at Toko-ri," except it
was a couple of deck apes.





Entry: 8552USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

RICHARD FURGISON wrote on January 24, 2009


Comments:

Looking for Marine who shipped to Korea, winter of 52-53, on the USS Washington, landed at Inchon, joined 1st Batalion,5th Marine 1st Marine Division Weapons Company.





Entry: 8534USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

C. OGREN wrote on January 6, 2009


Comments:

The navy ships the henrico and the noble ...anybody remember. 11th replacement draft





Entry: 8479USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

SGT JAMES HARVEY wrote on September 30, 2008


Comments:

Left San Diego Aug 16 1950 on Gen Meigs. Arrived Kobe Japan Aug 31 1950. Boarded George Clymer for transport to Korea Sep 8 1950. Participated in Assault and seizure of Inchon Sep 15, Kimpo airfield Sep 16, Seoul Sep 17 to Oct 7. Wonsan Hungnam, Chosin Campaign North Korea Oct 28 to Dec 11, 1950. Evauated Hungnam Dec 15 with 8000 Marines on a ship built to hold 3500. In operations against enemy forces in south and central Korea Dec 15 to Mar 14, 1951. Is there anyone out there who was with the 1st Div during these campaigns?





Entry: 8457USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

DON COLLINS USMC wrote on July 21, 2008


Comments:

Total Recall..
Hospital Ships in Inchon Harbor July 1952 - August 1953
As I remember there were 2 Anchored in the Harbor for
quite some time, The Repose and The Hope. The Hope was
Anchored just on the north side of the USNS Walker that
I was on waiting to depart for the United States in August 1953. They held the departure of the Walker over 7 days for 400 exchanged prisoners to sail with approx
2000 Marines.
Don Collins email doncollins@ameritech.net





Entry: 8456USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

DON COLLINS wrote on July 20, 2008


Comments:

After 56 years I am writing this.. I am thankfull to
Ted.. August 52 I departed SanDiego on the USNS AW Brewster. Had it not been for additional mess duty
@ Tent Camp I wud hv bn on the Meigs w/Sgt Peterson above. One nite in Kobe & on to Inchon into a train to
Munsan. Small arms rifle fire on the train but no
one hit. Asgnd to Hdqtrs Co 1st Engr Bn. Orders cut in
July 53 for August Rotation onboard USNS Brewster.. After
process in Ascom City held aboard ship for the fist 400
exchanged prinsoners. Arvd Treasure Island. Looking for Sgt Poulsen and Sgt OD Hall both vol for offensive
blocking position & never saw them again. Also Cpl
Bill Ferguson Hdqtrs Co 1st Tank Bn. Sgt Bryant, the
Hospital Ship in Inchon Harbor was "The Repose".. visited a couple of times. Thx for allowing me to write, Don Collins Phone 630 7629963 St Charles, IL





Entry: 8394USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

S/SGT PIERRE PETERSON wrote on March 11, 2008


Comments:

22nd draft arrived at Inchon July 4 (I think) 1952 on the General M.C. Meigs
and returned to Frisco in June '53 on the same ship. Two weeks of waiting in
chow lines is all I remember. Got to the north bank of the Imjin-gang (5th
Marines) that night to be greeted by a Chinese artillery Fourth of July
celebration before we even got out of the trucks. I don't think there were any
casualties, but it was a hell of a greeting.
The Meigs broke apart and sank while being towed off the Oregon coast
years later. Not knowing of that evil omen, I named my commercial fishing
boat General MC Meigs in 1976. It seemed funny at the time. My Meigs
survived, however, and is still fishing, though not by me.





Entry: 8393USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

JIM FRAZIER wrote on March 9, 2008


Comments:

my brother was there,(william Roy Frazier). He was
kia dec.6 1952..H-3-5.do you know him?





Entry: 8367USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

SGT ALEXANDER (ZAN) BRYANT wrote on November 21, 2007


Comments:

I too was on that ship,you have a great memory.I believe It was Easter Sunday the day we made Inchon. There was a
hospital ship there in the harbour. It turns out one of my buddies ( Jack Kiley) was evacuated to it that very day.He survived his wounds but just passed away last year.I remember the rickshaws very well.I also remember tripping over the railroad tracks down on the pier.We were slightly impaired.





Entry: 7746USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

SSGT JAMES D. MCWILLIAMS wrote on May 11, 2006


Comments:

I was part of 500 aviation and 4500 grunt Marines that rode the Weigel to Kobe, Japan. I believe we were the second draft. Left San Diego August 16, 1950 and 12 days later made Kobe. Being an aviation type we loaded up on a train and went to Itami AFB. The infantry types went to Korea. I remained in rear echelon with the squadron gear while my squadron, VMF-312 (Checkerboards)went to Korea in mid September during the Inchon landing. I did not rejoin the squadron until late October at Wonson and 3 weeks later we moved north to Yong-po to cover the withdrawal from the Chosin area. In mid December we returned to Itami AFB and spent about a month rebuilding the squadron aircraft and flew some strikes against Korean targets from Itami, but was quite long and stressful for the pilots, but the flights were badly needed. In mid January 51, the squadron moved again up to Korea to K-1, about 10 miles north of Pusun. In March we went aboard the light carrier, USS Bataan, CVL-29 in Pusun Harbor. We operated in the Sea of Japan and the Yellow Sea for about 3 months and left the ship in Kobe and returned to Itami AFB in June. From there back to K-1 in Korea for 3-4 months and then up to K-14. It was there in late October I received my orders to return to the states. Flew back to Itami AFB and 2 weeks later boarded the USNS Brewster in Yokohoma and 23 days later slid under the Golden Gate Bridge and docked at Fort Mason and home. Three months later was released from active duty at El Toro and returned home to Northern California. Remained in the reserves until May 62 and left as a E6 in Avionics. Semper Fi





Entry: 7706USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

GREG HUTCHINSON wrote on May 7, 2006


Comments:

Greetings,

I'm putting together an appreciation display box for my father. He was Army 1st Lt. Herbert A. Hutchinson, 8th U.S. Army, 20th Engineer Combat Battalion, from May 1954 to April 1955. He went to Korea on USNS Weigel. I'm trying to hook him up with some old buddies. Please contact me if you knew my father or know of any other engineers who might have known him. Thank you.





Entry: 7378USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

JR BOYER (CC) wrote on April 19, 2006


Comments:

Left San Diego in July 1952 for Yokohama Japan.
Sailed on the General Pope, does anyone remember
the replacement draft no.?
Went to Itami from Yokohama by train and flew to
K-6 from Itami.
Stationed K-6 bomb dump for 13 months came home
on the USNS Mann.
Semper Fi, Carry on





Entry: 2546USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

CHARLIE KOSTER wrote on August 13, 2005


Comments:

I shipped out from Camp Stoneman, California, in Oct. 1952. We boarded a ship in San Francisco headed for Korea but I can't recall the name of the ship. I'd appreciate any help. Hope someone has a better memory than I do. Thanks in advance.





Entry: 2127USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

LYNN D.WOODS wrote on January 12, 2005


Comments:

I LEFT SAN DIEGO ,JULY,AUG,,1950 0FIRST MARINE REP.FROM HOUSTON,TEXAS ,THINK WE SAILED ON THE ANDREW JACKSON ,16 DAYS TO KOBE ,JAPAN .THEN TO PUSON ,AND NORTH TO WONSAN,HUNGNAM,CHOSIN ,12 NOV.50/DEC 50,LATER IN SSOUTH & CENTRAL KOREA ,LATER HIT SPENT DAYS IN NAVY HOSPITAL TOKYO ,JAPAN ,,FIRST CALLED 14 TH.INFBN., USMCR/O/THEN BACK TO PORK CHOP HILL LATER /FIRST TIME ON E MAIL .LAST SAW J.R. DAVIS FROM MANSFIELD ,LA.,LEFT NICE FAMILY ,SHALL STAY IN CONTACT WITH MORE GOOD DOPE /CROSSED THE 38 SEVERAL TIMES , NOW RETIRED FROM OLD S/P R/R, LIVING IN SPRING ,TEXAS ,CLOSE TO BUSH ,LOVE TO HEAR /





Entry: 1924USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

CPL A NORMAN HOPKINS wrote on December 25, 2003


Comments:

I was a member of the 3rd Replacement Draft.
It was Thursday November 16, 1950. 1200 Marines, the 3rd Replacement Draft, were transported to a waiting troop ship, the USNS "General E T COLLINS", in San Diego Harbor. The transports were semi-trailers that were built to carry troops. We called them cattle cars because there was a close resemblance. Each Marine had stored all his personal and extra gear in his seabag. It was quite a sight to see companies of Marines, dressed in dungarees with full field packs, standing in formation waiting to board ship. There were crowds of people at the dock to see their loved ones leave for Korea. Each company would walk up the gangway single file. Troop ships are great huge steel vessels. The ship's deck was towering above us. It was exciting to be part of this giant operation.

   The USNS GENERAL E T COLLINS was built by Kaiser Ship Yard in Richmond, California and commissioned in 1944. She was 523 feet long, displaced 17,300 tons and had speeds up to 17.5 knots. She had twin screws and a round bottom and tended to roll when the seas were rough. During WWII she was equipped to carry 3,000 troops. The ship was named after Brigadier General Edgar Thomas Collins. He served in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. He also fought in the Philippines and later with the American Expeditionary Force in France during WWI.

   Dog Company was assigned to compartment 2E. The two referred to the second hole from the bow (that's the front) of the ship. And the E referred to the deck. The A and B decks were above the main deck so we were only two decks below the main deck. Our bunks were stacked five high. They were made of heavy pipe frames with a piece of canvas lashed to the frame. Everyone stowed their gear and then went on deck to watch the loading operation.

   It was about 1910 before the ship pulled away from the pier at the foot of Broadway in San Diego. The Band was playing and people were waving goodbye as we left. The Marines were in small groups on the main deck, talking and watching the lights of San Diego fade on the horizon. Some had illegally brought bottles of hard liquor on board. They proceeded to get drunk. The Officers and NCO's looked the other way. These men seemed to think that they could escape by using alcohol. In the morning they would find that there is no escape only the consequences. It was dark on the horizon and nearly midnight before I returned to compartment 2E.

   I had selected a top bunk. There seemed to be more headroom. I went to sleep listening to men talking, several card games in progress, and the sounds of the ship underway. One thing was bothering me. The US ARMED FORCES were kicking the hell out of the North Korean troops. US troops were nearly to the Yulu River. It looked like this "police action" would be over before I could fire a round at the enemy. I felt a little disappointed that I would be serving my country in an occupation force instead of on the field of battle.

(from Autobiography "11 Months and 19 Days."
MY SERVICE TO MY COUNTRY IN KOREA BY ALFRED N. HOPKINS






Entry: 1897USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

TED BARKER wrote on December 2, 2003


Comments:

Folks,

I deleted the messages from Bob Daly. Not really interested in seeing bickering on a site that is dedicated to fostering fellowship among veterans as Chris noted in his reply to Daly.

I would appreciate hearing about any stuff that does not belong on the message groups.

As most of you know, we get so much email that it is impossible for Hal and I to monitor all of the postings.

Big Hello to Chris and Rick!

Ted





Entry: 1891USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

LARRY MCDONOUGH wrote on November 28, 2003


Comments:

I was on the 5th draft from San Diego arrived Korea 5th of February via Kobe Japan, I think USS Wegel. Ended up in wpns 2nd 7th as 81 fo radio operator.
Coming back in 3/52 I thought I would have it made as I
was a 3 strip, but lo and behold almost every one else
was the same. Typical Corps. Stayed in reserves untill
1960.






Entry: 1841USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

CHARLIE WONSEWITZ (P.F.C.) wrote on September 15, 2003


Comments:

I was in the 13th draft,do not remember the ship name, i do remember our draft was only draft at that time to get no liberty in japan.we departed ship,walked across the dock with all our gear whent up gangplank onto an A.P.A.and left for korea.if i remember correctly that ship was all 5th marine replacement as 5th marines had been hit hard.i was sent F-2-5,2nd platoon.I also whent thru the move from no. to so. korea. fox co. was set up on m.l.r. astradle the the pamunjom rd. we used to see the vehicles going to peace talks every day.I managed to not get killed,but did get wounded.spent one year there,came back to states and sent to mare island naval shipyard,m.p. detachment,was discharged from in march of 1954. c.j. wonsewitz





Entry: 1451USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

C.R. GOSS wrote on October 2, 2002


Comments:

To give you an update on ships that were active during KW and PRE-NAM........Don't know the trip number but my time on USNS GEN WALKER started @ TI and ended @ Naha Okinawa in '55 where I joined 3rd Mar Div 4 Duece Regiment as a RTO (MOS 2533). Later, during operations, spent watches onboard USS BAYFIELD APA-33, USS SALINE COUNTY LST-1101, USS PRINCETON CVA/CVS-37, USS YORKTOWN CVA/CVS-10 AND USS WHITESIDE AKA-90. All are gone now except Yorktown. (Patriots Pt.,SC) Anyone that was on these ships during '55-'56 please contact me.
SEMPER FI,
C.R. Goss





Entry: 1428USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

LARRY BARICKMAN wrote on September 9, 2002


Comments:

I was on the 39th draft and the ship was the General Pope. It was a good old ship and it made many trips to Korea and back. I know 1 Marine that went to Korea on the Gen in 1950. Anyone that was on the 39th draft, please contact me. Semper Fi, Larry





Entry: 1269USNS TROOPSHIPS TO KOREA

RICHARD A. SUAREZ wrote on March 18, 2002


Comments:

DOING OK, HAVE A MOTHER AND FATHER DYING ON ME SO I HAVEN;T BEEN ABLE TO ATTEND ALL THE REUNIONS THAT I'D LIKE TO. MORE INVOLVE WITH THE IST MAR DIV ASSOC., OF NO CALIF, REALLY ENJOY WORKING WITH VINCE RIOS. HEALTH WISE I'M OK GOT OVER WITH THE BALLTE OF THE CANCER. ENJOY YOUR STORIES. BEST RICK SUAREZ I-3-7 KO CF 50/51





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